1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Glass Box Gardens would like to wish every member a Merry and a very safe Christmas. Don’t forget to pop in and say hello. You can let us know how your Aquariums etc are going. [IMG]https://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b209/keithgh/HUMOUR%20MIXED/Aquarium%20%20Xmas%202018%20_edited-1.jpg[/IMG] From Jason the Founder and Keith Administrator
    Dismiss Notice

Soil Selection

Discussion in 'Wabi Kusa General Discussion' started by wabisabi, Sep 23, 2017.

  1. wabisabi

    wabisabi New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2017
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    5
    Address:
    United States
    Country:
    Has anyone tried using something like Sera Super Peat for their soil in a wabi-kusa?

    keto soil けと土 is the traditional product used in kokedama 苔玉. Since keto is peat, and kokedama uses a similar, if not same, substrate ball technique . . . and Sera Super Peat is peat with the same properties as most of the standard aqua soils (minus the added micro-organism cultures) . . . I was just curious what others thought about using something inexpensive, like Sera. One would still have to mix in the sphagnum and maybe even a little lava gravel or akadama 赤玉, it probably wouldn't hurt to add a bacter or tourmaline equivalent for the micro-organism/fertilizer layer.

    Thoughts?
     
  2. Keith

    Keith Administrator
    Staff Member Administrator

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2014
    Messages:
    2,140
    Likes Received:
    1,198
    Address:
    Australia
    Country:
    wabisabi

    It would be all new to me the only member I know who could have helped you has not posted for some time.

    The Sera "Super Peat" looks like nothing more than dried and compressed peat.

    WK is basically making a ball and attaching plants. If that is the case why would want to add all the other (bits and pieces) I can see the value in attaching live fresh Sphagnum Moss to the ball. Orchid growers have been attaching Sphagnum to wood/cork bark then attaching the Orchid with great success for many years.

    I have been trying to remember what Roy used to do.

    Keith:cathug::cathug:
     
  3. wabisabi

    wabisabi New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2017
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    5
    Address:
    United States
    Country:
    That would sound like a proper soil for orchids, considering how those plants root.

    My argument with respect to Wabi Kusa would be something about the aesthetic that wk represents and that it is nothing ado with a ball. The ball is but one possible way to present the wk aesthetic.

    I have a box of super peat laying around ... seems silly not to try it :)
     
    Keith likes this.
  4. TimHarrison

    TimHarrison Super Moderator
    Staff Member Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2017
    Messages:
    175
    Likes Received:
    171
    Address:
    United Kingdom
    Country:
    Give it a go, part of the fun is experimenting. Adding fertz will probably be a good idea though.
     
    moss-maniac and Keith like this.
  5. Keith

    Keith Administrator
    Staff Member Administrator

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2014
    Messages:
    2,140
    Likes Received:
    1,198
    Address:
    Australia
    Country:
    wabisabi

    There is no way it should not work and you will learn more as you proceed along.

    Keith:cathug::cathug:
     
  6. moss-maniac

    moss-maniac Custom Text
    V.I.P Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2014
    Messages:
    700
    Likes Received:
    495
    Address:
    Germany
    Country:
    :) Welcome Wabi Sabi,

    I am glad, that you have found to us.

    Just try it - you have it already laying around.

    I think also sphagnum is not absolutely necessary (and here sphagnum is expensive) - your success depends more from taking the right amount of humidity and for sure which plants you choose.

    I am curious for your works already
     
    Keith and TimHarrison like this.
  7. wabisabi

    wabisabi New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2017
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    5
    Address:
    United States
    Country:
    Today I slapped together a few substrate balls. Below are some pics of the completed works, based on the input from various sources; these will sit for approximately 24 hours to dry before I move into a second step. You will note that one of these balls has been wrapped in orchid grade sphagnum moss and tied rather tightly.

    The first attempt, I mistakenly took a short-cut and watched as it quickly turned the water black. I wrapped it christmas moss without letting it dry even for an hour . . . mistake. Anyway, I am waiting to see how bad this error is - as I've left the ball submersed. It is wrapped in xmas moss and has a sword leaf planted. The other three are going to rest overnight.

    I have a veritable cornucopia of plants, most of which are already in their emersed forms (cardinalis, verticillata, sibthorpioides, tripartita, reineckii, lyratta, cuba, monte carlo, and flame moss). I have a few crypts I could play with too ... what follows is my recipe for making the substrate balls. Please note that I follow a similar recipe for kokedama or kusamono plantings.

    1. Dennerle Scaper's Soil (2 parts)*
    2. Orchid Sphagnam (1 part)
    3. Aggregate Mix: Fine Akadama, Seachem Flourite, and Seachem Onyx Sand (1 part)
    4. Natural Red Clay (Low Fire) [approx. 10%]

    I mix and combine the soil using RO/DI water. I am adding the red pottery clay for its iron content as this will provide additional trace nutrients for plants like crypts and echinodorus, that need the iron for color and growth. I did not add any root fertilizers, specifically because the seachem flourish products are enriched with a large quantity of trace minerals and should last a considerable amount of time.

    *I use standard organic raised bed gardening soil for kokedama/kusamono - this soil is comprised of peat, cococoir, and worm castings. In truth, if my understanding of things is correct - the deviation is not important as the garden soil could also be used in an aquatic setting.

    I have not, as of yet, tried the sera peat . . . I realized I had a spare bag of scaper's soil laying about.

    P.S. I submersed the first ball because I wanted to easily transfer the plant, as I am moving the plant and fish into a new tank . . . so I needed a temporary home. The substrate ball seemed like an "easy" way to do and look stylish too. Why should a fish bowl be boring?!


    First Ball (a little too wet and without the clay):
    4E0471CF-9E7F-4194-8601-9C2CD9E567CC.

    Second, Third and Fourth (one wrapped in sphagnum moss):
    IMG_0975.JPG IMG_0976.JPG

    The Fish bowl (it's been setting a few hours, so the dust is settling):
    IMG_0978.JPG
     

    Attached Files:

    Keith likes this.
  8. Keith

    Keith Administrator
    Staff Member Administrator

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2014
    Messages:
    2,140
    Likes Received:
    1,198
    Address:
    Australia
    Country:
    wabisabi
    I think we have all made that mistake in one way or another, its called the "Learning Process".

    Your post will be very interesting to follow.

    This smilie will be perfect for you :wabi-kusa::wabi-kusa:

    Keith:cathug::cathug:
     

Share This Page

Loading...